Start Menu

  1. Start Menu Troubleshooter
  2. Start Menu
  3. Start Menu Not Working Windows 10
  4. Start Menu Location
  • 2 ways to open Start Menu in Windows 10: Way 1: Open Start Menu with Start button. FYI, the Start button (as shown in the following screen shot) is back in Windows 10. Therefore, you can click it to immediately open the Start Menu. Way 2: Open Start Menu by use of Windows Logo Key.
  • Restart the Start menu. More often than not, restarting the Start menu process fixes all issued related to the Start menu. Step 1: Use Ctrl + Shift +Esc keys to open the Task Manager. Step 2: Click More details to see the full-version of Task Manager. Step 3: Under the Processes tab, look for Start entry, right-click on the same, and then click.
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Applies to

Start Menu 10 replaces the yellow folder icons with application icons. Clicking on the folder launches the application. To access a submenu, hover the cursor over a folder for a few seconds. For the first launch, the application launched is determined automatically.

  • Windows 10
Start Menu

Looking for consumer information? See Customize the Start menu

On Windows 10 for desktop editions, the customized Start works by:

  • Windows 10 checks the chosen base default layout, such as the desktop edition and whether Cortana is supported for the country/region.

  • Windows 10 reads the LayoutModification.xml file and allows groups to be appended to Start. The groups have the following constraints:

    • 2 groups that are 6 columns wide, or equivalent to the width of 3 medium tiles.
    • 2 medium-sized tile rows in height. Windows 10 ignores any tiles that are pinned beyond the second row.
    • No limit to the number of apps that can be pinned. There is a theoretical limit of 24 tiles per group (4 small tiles per medium square x 3 columns x 2 rows).

Note

To use the layout modification XML to configure Start with roaming user profiles, see Deploying Roaming User Profiles.

LayoutModification XML

IT admins can provision the Start layout using a LayoutModification.xml file. This file supports several mechanisms to modify or replace the default Start layout and its tiles. The easiest method for creating a LayoutModification.xml file is by using the Export-StartLayout cmdlet; see Customize and export Start layout for instructions.

Required order

The XML schema for LayoutModification.xml requires the following order for tags directly under the LayoutModificationTemplate node:

  1. LayoutOptions
  2. DefaultLayoutOverride
  3. RequiredStartGroupsCollection
  4. AppendDownloadOfficeTile –OR– AppendOfficeSuite (only one Office option can be used at a time)
  5. AppendOfficeSuiteChoice
  6. TopMFUApps
  7. CustomTaskbarLayoutCollection
  8. InkWorkspaceTopApps
  9. StartLayoutCollection

Comments are not supported in the LayoutModification.xml file.

Supported elements and attributes

Note

To make sure the Start layout XML parser processes your file correctly, follow these guidelines when working with your LayoutModification.xml file:

  • Do not leave spaces or white lines in between each element.
  • Do not add comments inside the StartLayout node or any of its children elements.
  • Do not add multiple rows of comments.

The following table lists the supported elements and attributes for the LayoutModification.xml file.

Note

RequiredStartGroupsCollection and AppendGroup syntax only apply when the Import-StartLayout method is used for building and deploying Windows images.

ElementAttributesDescription
LayoutModificationTemplatexmlns
xmlns:defaultlayout
xmlns:start
Version
Use to describe the changes to the default Start layout
LayoutOptions
Parent:
LayoutModificationTemplate
StartTileGroupsColumnCount
FullScreenStart
Use to specify:
- Whether to use full screen Start on the desktop
- The number of tile columns in the Start menu
RequiredStartGroupsCollection
Parent:
LayoutModificationTemplate
n/aUse to contain collection of RequiredStartGroups
RequiredStartGroups
Parent:
RequiredStartGroupsCollection
RegionUse to contain the AppendGroup tags, which represent groups that can be appended to the default Start layout
AppendGroup
Parent:
RequiredStartGroups
NameUse to specify the tiles that need to be appended to the default Start layout
start:Tile
Parent:
AppendGroup
AppUserModelID
Size
Row
Column
Use to specify any of the following:
- A Universal Windows app
- A Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 app
Note that AppUserModelID is case-sensitive.
start:Folder
Parent:
start:Group
Name (in Windows 10, version 1809 and later only)
Size
Row
Column
LocalizedNameResourcetag
Use to specify a folder of icons; can include Tile, SecondaryTile, and DesktopApplicationTile.
start:DesktopApplicationTile
Parent:
AppendGroup
DesktopApplicationID
DesktopApplicationLinkPath
Size
Row
Column
Use to specify any of the following:
- A Windows desktop application with a known AppUserModelID
- An application in a known folder with a link in a legacy Start Menu folder
- A Windows desktop application link in a legacy Start Menu folder
- A Web link tile with an associated .url file that is in a legacy Start Menu folder
start:SecondaryTile
Parent:
AppendGroup
AppUserModelID
TileID
Arguments
DisplayName
Square150x150LogoUri
ShowNameOnSquare150x150Logo
ShowNameOnWide310x150Logo
Wide310x150LogoUri
BackgroundColor
ForegroundText
IsSuggestedApp
Size
Row
Column
Use to pin a Web link through a Microsoft Edge secondary tile. Note that AppUserModelID is case-sensitive.
TopMFUApps
Parent:
LayoutModificationTemplate
n/aUse to add up to 3 default apps to the frequently used apps section in the system area.
Note: Only applies to versions of Windows 10 earlier than version 1709. In Windows 10, version 1709, you can no longer pin apps to the Most Frequently Used apps list in Start.
Tile
Parent:
TopMFUApps
AppUserModelIDUse with the TopMFUApps tags to specify an app with a known AppUserModelID.
Note: Only applies to versions of Windows 10 earlier than version 1709. In Windows 10, version 1709, you can no longer pin apps to the Most Frequently Used apps list in Start.
DesktopApplicationTile
Parent:
TopMFUApps
LinkFilePathUse with the TopMFUApps tags to specify an app without a known AppUserModelID.
Note: Only applies to versions of Windows 10 earlier than version 1709. In Windows 10, version 1709, you can no longer pin apps to the Most Frequently Used apps list in Start.
AppendOfficeSuite
Parent:
LayoutModificationTemplate
n/aUse to add the in-box installed Office suite to Start. For more information, see Customize the Office suite of tiles.
Do not use this tag with AppendDownloadOfficeTile
AppendDownloadOfficeTile
Parent:
LayoutModificationTemplate
n/aUse to add a specific Download Office tile to a specific location in Start
Do not use this tag with AppendOfficeSuite

LayoutOptions

New devices running Windows 10 for desktop editions will default to a Start menu with 2 columns of tiles unless boot to tablet mode is enabled. Devices with screens that are under 10' have boot to tablet mode enabled by default. For these devices, users see the full screen Start on the desktop. You can adjust the following features:

  • Boot to tablet mode can be set on or off.
  • Set full screen Start on desktop to on or off.To do this, add the LayoutOptions element in your LayoutModification.xml file and set the FullScreenStart attribute to true or false.
  • Specify the number of columns in the Start menu to 1 or 2.To do this, add the LayoutOptions element in your LayoutModification.xml file and set the StartTileGroupsColumnCount attribute to 1 or 2.

The following example shows how to use the LayoutOptions element to specify full screen Start on the desktop and to use 1 column in the Start menu:

For devices being upgraded to Windows 10 for desktop editions:

  • Devices being upgraded from Windows 7 will default to a Start menu with 1 column.
  • Devices being upgraded from Windows 8.1 or Windows 8.1 Upgrade will default to a Start menu with 2 columns.

RequiredStartGroups

The RequiredStartGroups tag contains AppendGroup tags that represent groups that you can append to the default Start layout.

Start Menu Troubleshooter

Important

For Windows 10 for desktop editions, you can add a maximum of two (2) AppendGroup tags per RequiredStartGroups tag.

You can also assign regions to the append groups in the RequiredStartGroups tag's using the optional Region attribute or you can use the multivariant capabilities in Windows provisioning. If you are using the Region attribute, you must use a two-letter country code to specify the country/region that the append group(s) apply to. To specify more than one country/region, use a pipe (' ') delimiter as shown in the following example:

If the country/region setting for the Windows device matches a RequiredStartGroups, then the tiles laid out within the RequiredStartGroups is applied to Start.

If you specify a region-agnostic RequiredStartGroups (or one without the optional Region attribute) then the region-agnostic RequiredStartGroups is applied to Start.

AppendGroup

AppendGroup tags specify a group of tiles that will be appended to Start. There is a maximum of two AppendGroup tags allowed per RequiredStartGroups tag.

For Windows 10 for desktop editions, AppendGroup tags contain start:Tile, start:DesktopApplicationTile, or start:SecondaryTile tags.

Menu

You can specify any number of tiles in an AppendGroup, but you cannot specify a tile with a Row attribute greater than 4. The Start layout does not support overlapping tiles.

Specify Start tiles

To pin tiles to Start, partners must use the right kind of tile depending on what you want to pin.

Tile size and coordinates

All tile types require a size (Size) and coordinates (Row and Column) attributes regardless of the tile type that you use when prepinning items to Start.

The following table describes the attributes that you must use to specify the size and location for the tile.

AttributeDescription
SizeDetermines how large the tile will be.
- 1x1 - small tile
- 2x2 - medium tile
- 4x2 - wide tile
- 4x4 - large tile
RowSpecifies the row where the tile will appear.
ColumnSpecifies the column where the tile will appear.

For example, a tile with Size='2x2', Row='2', and Column='2' results in a tile located at (2,2) where (0,0) is the top-left corner of a group.

#### start:Tile

Start Menu

You can use the start:Tile tag to pin any of the following apps to Start:

  • A Universal Windows app
  • A Windows 8 app or Windows 8.1 app

To specify any one of these apps, you must set the AppUserModelID attribute to the application user model ID that's associated with the corresponding app.

Important

AppUserModelID (AUMID) is case-sensitive.

The following example shows how to pin the Microsoft Edge Universal Windows app:

#### start:DesktopApplicationTile

You can use the start:DesktopApplicationTile tag to pin a Windows desktop application to Start. There are two ways you can specify a Windows desktop application:

  • By using a path to a shortcut link (.lnk file) to a Windows desktop application.

    Note

    In Start layouts for Windows 10, version 1703, you should use DesktopApplicationID rather than DesktopApplicationLinkPath if you are using Group Policy or MDM to apply the start layout and the application was installed after the user's first sign-in.

    To pin a Windows desktop application through this method, you must first add the .lnk file in the specified location when the device first boots.

    The following example shows how to pin the Command Prompt:

    You must set the DesktopApplicationLinkPath attribute to the .lnk file that points to the Windows desktop application. The path also supports environment variables.

    If you are pointing to a third-party Windows desktop application and the layout is being applied before the first boot, you must put the .lnk file in a legacy Start Menu directory before first boot; for example, '%APPDATA%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms' or the all users profile '%ALLUSERSPROFILE%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms'.

  • By using the application's application user model ID, if this is known. If the Windows desktop application doesn't have one, use the shortcut link option.

    You can use the Get-StartApps cmdlet on a PC that has the application pinned to Start to obtain the app ID.

    To pin a Windows desktop application through this method, you must set the DesktopApplicationID attribute to the application user model ID that's associated with the corresponding app.

    The following example shows how to pin the File Explorer Windows desktop application:

You can also use the start:DesktopApplicationTile tag as one of the methods for pinning a Web link to Start. The other method is to use a Microsoft Edge secondary tile.

To pin a legacy .url shortcut to Start, you must create .url file (right-click on the desktop, select New > Shortcut, and then type a Web URL). You must add this .url file in a legacy Start Menu directory before first boot; for example, %APPDATA%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms or the all users profile %ALLUSERSPROFILE%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms.

The following example shows how to create a tile of the Web site's URL, which you can treat similarly to a Windows desktop application tile:

Note

In Windows 10, version 1703, Export-StartLayout will use DesktopApplicationLinkPath for the .url shortcut. You must change DesktopApplicationLinkPath to DesktopApplicationID and provide the URL.

#### start:SecondaryTile

You can use the start:SecondaryTile tag to pin a Web link through a Microsoft Edge secondary tile. This method doesn't require any additional action compared to the method of using legacy .url shortcuts (through the start:DesktopApplicationTile tag).

The following example shows how to create a tile of the Web site's URL using the Microsoft Edge secondary tile:

The following table describes the other attributes that you can use with the start:SecondaryTile tag in addition to Size, Row, and Column.

AttributeRequired/optionalDescription
AppUserModelIDRequiredMust point to Microsoft Edge. Note that AppUserModelID is case-sensitive.
TileIDRequiredMust uniquely identify your Web site tile.
ArgumentsRequiredMust contain the URL of your Web site.
DisplayNameRequiredMust specify the text that you want users to see.
Square150x150LogoUriRequiredSpecifies the logo to use on the 2x2 tile.
Wide310x150LogoUriOptionalSpecifies the logo to use on the 4x2 tile.
ShowNameOnSquare150x150LogoOptionalSpecifies whether the display name is shown on the 2x2 tile. The values you can use for this attribute are true or false.
ShowNameOnWide310x150LogoOptionalSpecifies whether the display name is shown on the 4x2 tile. The values you can use for this attribute are true or false.
BackgroundColorOptionalSpecifies the color of the tile. You can specify the value in ARGB hexadecimal (for example, #FF112233) or specify 'transparent'.
ForegroundTextOptionalSpecifies the color of the foreground text. Set the value to either 'light' or 'dark'.

Secondary Microsoft Edge tiles have the same size and location behavior as a Universal Windows app, Windows 8 app, or Windows 8.1 app.

TopMFUApps

Note

Only applies to versions of Windows 10 earlier than version 1709. In Windows 10, version 1709, you can no longer pin apps to the Most Frequently Used apps list in Start.

You can use the TopMFUApps tag to add up to 3 default apps to the frequently used apps section in the system area, which delivers system-driven lists to the user including important or frequently accessed system locations and recently installed apps.

You can use this tag to add:

  • Apps with an AppUserModelID attribute - This includes Windows desktop applications that have a known application user model ID. Use a Tile tag with the AppUserModelID attribute set to the app's application user model ID.
  • Apps without a AppUserModelID attribute - For these apps, you must create a .lnk file that points to the installed app and place the .lnk file in the %ALLUSERSPROFILE%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms directory. Use a DesktopApplicationTile tag with the LinkFilePath attribute set to the .lnk file name and path.

The following example shows how to modify your LayoutModification.xml file to add both kinds of apps to the system area in Start:

AppendOfficeSuite

You can use the AppendOfficeSuite tag to add the in-box installed Office suite of apps to Start.

Note

The OEM must have installed Office for this tag to work.

The following example shows how to add the AppendOfficeSuite tag to your LayoutModification.xml file to append the full Universal Office suite to Start:

AppendOfficeSuiteChoice

Start menu

This tag is added in Windows 10, version 1803. You have two options in this tag:

  • <AppendOfficeSuiteChoice Choice='DesktopBridgeSubscription'/>
  • <AppendOfficeSuiteChoice Choice='DesktopBridge'/>

Use Choice=DesktopBridgeSubscription on devices running Windows 10, version 1803, that have Office 365 preinstalled. This will set the heading of the Office suite of tiles to Office 365, to highlight the Office 365 apps that you've made available on the device.

Use Choice=DesktopBridge on devices running versions of Windows 10 earlier than version 1803, and on devices shipping with perpetual licenses for Office. This will set the heading of the Office suite of tiles to Create.

For more information, see Customize the Office suite of tiles.

AppendDownloadOfficeTile

You can use the AppendDownloadOfficeTile tag to append the Office trial installer to Start. This tag adds the Download Office tile to Start and the download tile will appear at the bottom right-hand side of the second group.

Note

The OEM must have installed the Office trial installer for this tag to work.

The following example shows how to add the AppendDownloadOfficeTile tag to your LayoutModification.xml file:

Sample LayoutModification.xml

Start menu shortcut

The following sample LayoutModification.xml shows how you can configure the Start layout for devices running Windows 10 for desktop editions:

Use Windows Provisioning multivariant support

The Windows Provisioning multivariant capability allows you to declare target conditions that, when met, supply specific customizations for each variant condition. For Start customization, you can create specific layouts for each variant that you have. To do this, you must create a separate LayoutModification.xml file for each variant that you want to support and then include these in your provisioning package. For more information on how to do this, see Create a provisioning package with multivariant settings.

The provisioning engine chooses the right customization file based on the target conditions that were met, adds the file in the location that's specified for the setting, and then uses the specific file to customize Start. To differentiate between layouts, you can add modifiers to the LayoutModification.xml filename such as 'LayoutCustomization1'. Regardless of the modifier that you use, the provsioning engine will always output 'LayoutCustomization.xml' so that the operating system has a consistent file name to query against.

For example, if you want to ensure that there's a specific layout for a certain condition, you can:

  1. Create a specific layout customization file and then name it LayoutCustomization1.xml.
  2. Include the file as part of your provisioning package.
  3. Create your multivariant target and reference the XML file within the target condition in the main customization XML file.

The following example shows what the overall customization file might look like with multivariant support for Start:

When the condition is met, the provisioning engine takes the XML file and places it in the location that the operating system has set and then the Start subsystem reads the file and applies the specific customized layout.

You must repeat this process for all variants that you want to support so that each variant can have a distinct layout for each of the conditions and targets that need to be supported. For example, if you add a Language condition, you can create a Start layout that has its own localized group.

Add the LayoutModification.xml file to the device

Once you have created your LayoutModification.xml file to customize devices that will run Windows 10 for desktop editions, you can use Windows ICD methods to add the XML file to the device.

  1. In the Available customizations pane, expand Runtime settings, select Start and then click the StartLayout setting.
  2. In the middle pane, click Browse to open File Explorer.
  3. In the File Explorer window, navigate to the location where you saved your LayoutModification.xml file.
  4. Select the file and then click Open.

This should set the value of StartLayout. The setting appears in the Selected customizations pane.

Note

There is currently no way to add the .url and .lnk files through Windows ICD.

Once you have created the LayoutModification.xml file and it is present in the device, the system overrides the base default layout and any Unattend settings used to customize Start.

Related topics

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Applies to

  • Windows 10

Looking for consumer information? See Customize the Start menu

The easiest method for creating a customized Start layout to apply to other Windows 10 devices is to set up the Start screen on a test computer and then export the layout.

After you export the layout, decide whether you want to apply a full Start layout or a partial Start layout.

When a full Start layout is applied, the users cannot pin, unpin, or uninstall apps from Start. Users can view and open all apps in the All Apps view, but they cannot pin any apps to Start.

When a partial Start layout is applied, the contents of the specified tile groups cannot be changed, but users can move those groups, and can also create and customize their own groups.

Note

Partial Start layout is only supported on Windows 10, version 1511 and later.

You can deploy the resulting .xml file to devices using one of the following methods:

Customize the Start screen on your test computer

To prepare a Start layout for export, you simply customize the Start layout on a test computer.

To prepare a test computer

  1. Set up a test computer on which to customize the Start layout. Your test computer should have the operating system that is installed on the users’ computers (Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise, or Education). Install all apps and services that the Start layout should display.

  2. Create a new user account that you will use to customize the Start layout.

To customize Start

  1. Sign in to your test computer with the user account that you created.

  2. Customize the Start layout as you want users to see it by using the following techniques:

    • Pin apps to Start. From Start, type the name of the app. When the app appears in the search results, right-click the app, and then click Pin to Start.

      To view all apps, click All apps in the bottom-left corner of Start. Right-click any app, and pin or unpin it from Start.

    • Unpin apps that you don’t want to display. To unpin an app, right-click the app, and then click Unpin from Start.

    • Drag tiles on Start to reorder or group apps.

    • Resize tiles. To resize tiles, right-click the tile and then click Resize.

    • Create your own app groups. Drag the apps to an empty area. To name a group, click above the group of tiles and then type the name in the Name group field that appears above the group.

Important

In Windows 10, version 1703, if the Start layout includes tiles for apps that are not installed on the device that the layout is later applied to, the tiles for those apps will be blank. The blank tiles will persist until the next time the user signs in, at which time the blank tiles are removed. Some system events may cause the blank tiles to be removed before the next sign-in.

In earlier versions of Windows 10, no tile would be pinned.

Export the Start layout

When you have the Start layout that you want your users to see, use the Export-StartLayout cmdlet in Windows PowerShell to export the Start layout to an .xml file. Start layout is located by default at C:UsersusernameAppDataLocalMicrosoftWindowsShell

Important

If you include secondary Microsoft Edge tiles (tiles that link to specific websites in Microsoft Edge), see Add custom images to Microsoft Edge secondary tiles for instructions.

To export the Start layout to an .xml file

  1. While signed in with the same account that you used to customize Start, right-click Start, and select Windows PowerShell.

  2. On a device running Windows 10, version 1607, 1703, or 1803, at the Windows PowerShell command prompt, enter the following command:

    Export-StartLayout –path <path><file name>.xml

    On a device running Windows 10, version 1809 or higher, run the Export-StartLayout with the switch -UseDesktopApplicationID. For example:

    In the previous command, -path is a required parameter that specifies the path and file name for the export file. You can specify a local path or a UNC path (for example, FileServer01StartLayoutsStartLayoutMarketing.xml).

    Use a file name of your choice—for example, StartLayoutMarketing.xml. Include the .xml file name extension. The Export-StartLayout cmdlet does not append the file name extension, and the policy settings require the extension.

    Example of a layout file produced by Export-StartLayout:

    XML
  3. (Optional) Edit the .xml file to add a taskbar configuration or to modify the exported layout. When you make changes to the exported layout, be aware that the order of the elements in the .xml file is critical.

Important

If the Start layout that you export contains tiles for desktop (Win32) apps or .url links, Export-StartLayout will use DesktopApplicationLinkPath in the resulting file. Use a text or XML editor to change DesktopApplicationLinkPath to DesktopApplicationID. See Specify Start tiles for details on using the app ID in place of the link path.

Note

All clients that the start layout applies to must have the apps and other shortcuts present on the local system in the same location as the source for the Start layout.

For scripts and application tile pins to work correctly, follow these rules:

  • Executable files and scripts should be listed in Program Files or wherever the installer of the app places them.

  • Shortcuts that will pinned to Start should be placed in ProgramDataMicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms.

  • If you place executable files or scripts in the ProgramDataMicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms folder, they will not pin to Start.

  • Start on Windows 10 does not support subfolders. We only support one folder. For example, ProgramDataMicrosoftWindowsStart MenuProgramsFolder. If you go any deeper than one folder, Start will compress the contents of all the subfolder to the top level.

  • Three additional shortcuts are pinned to the start menu after the export. These are shortcuts to %ALLUSERSPROFILE%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms, %APPDATA%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms, and %APPDATA%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuProgramsSystem Tools.

Start Menu Not Working Windows 10

Configure a partial Start layout

A partial Start layout enables you to add one or more customized tile groups to users' Start screens or menus, while still allowing users to make changes to other parts of the Start layout. All groups that you add are locked, meaning users cannot change the contents of those tile groups, however users can change the location of those groups. Locked groups are identified with an icon, as shown in the following image.

When a partial Start layout is applied for the first time, the new groups are added to the users' existing Start layouts. If an app tile is in both an existing group and in a new locked group, the duplicate app tile is removed from the existing (unlocked) group.

When a partial Start layout is applied to a device that already has a StartLayout.xml applied, groups that were added previously are removed and the groups in the new layout are added.

If the Start layout is applied by Group Policy or MDM, and the policy is removed, the groups remain on the devices but become unlocked.

Start Menu Location

To configure a partial Start screen layout

  1. Customize the Start layout.

  2. Export the Start layout.

  3. Open the layout .xml file. There is a <DefaultLayoutOverride> element. Add LayoutCustomizationRestrictionType='OnlySpecifiedGroups' to the DefaultLayoutOverride element as follows:

  4. Save the file and apply using any of the deployment methods.

Note

Office 2019 tiles might be removed from the Start menu when you upgrade Office 2019. This only occurs if Office 2019 app tiles are in a custom group in the Start menu and only contains the Office 2019 app tiles. To avoid this problem, place another app tile in the Office 2019 group prior to the upgrade. For example, add Notepad.exe or calc.exe to the group. This issue occurs because Office 2019 removes and reinstalls the apps when they are upgraded. Start removes empty groups when it detects that all apps for that group have been removed.

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