SolEol

Authors
  1. Soleil Fire Emblem
Gregory YH Lip, MD, FRCPE, FESC, FACC

Thank you so much for your ongoing support. Right now we're closing and taking a step back. We hope to see you soon and again thank you for all the love! Definition of soleil (Entry 2 of 2): a fabric with a soleil finish or weave.

Gregory YH Lip, MD, FRCPE, FESC, FACC

  • Price-Evans Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Liverpool, UK
  • Distinguished Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Adjunct Professor, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
  • Adjunct Professor, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
Russell D Hull, MBBS, MSc

Russell D Hull, MBBS, MSc

  • Professor of Medicine
  • University of Calgary, Canada
Section Editors
Lawrence LK Leung, MD

Lawrence LK Leung, MD

  • Editor-in-Chief — Hematology
  • Section Editor — Disorders of Hemostasis and Coagulation
  • Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor of Medicine
  • Stanford University School of Medicine
Jess Mandel, MD

Jess Mandel, MD

  • Section Editor — Pulmonary Vascular Disease
  • Kenneth M. Moser Professor of Medicine
  • Chief, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine
  • Vice-Chair for Education, Department of Internal Medicine
  • UC San Diego School of Medicine
Deputy Editor
Geraldine Finlay, MD

Geraldine Finlay, MD

  • Senior Deputy Editor — UpToDate
  • Deputy Editor — Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
  • Associate Professor
  • Tufts University School of Medicine

INTRODUCTION

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are two manifestations of venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE contributes to significant morbidity and mortality both in the community and in hospital. The mainstay of therapy for DVT is anticoagulation, provided there is no contraindication. Following initial anticoagulation, patients with DVT are anticoagulated further to prevent future recurrences, embolism, and thrombosis-related death.

An overview of the treatment of lower extremity DVT (distal and proximal), including indications for anticoagulation, alternate therapies, and treatment of special populations of patients with DVT, are discussed in this topic. Initial, long-term, and extended (indefinite) anticoagulation for DVT, as well as the treatment of PE, upper extremity DVT, and the diagnosis and prevention of DVT, are discussed in detail separately. (See 'Venous thromboembolism: Initiation of anticoagulation (first 10 days)' and 'Venous thromboembolism: Anticoagulation after initial management' and 'Rationale and indications for indefinite anticoagulation in patients with venous thromboembolism' and 'Treatment, prognosis, and follow-up of acute pulmonary embolism in adults' and 'Clinical presentation and diagnosis of the nonpregnant adult with suspected deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity' and 'Prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in acutely ill hospitalized medical adults' and 'Prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in adult nonorthopedic surgical patients'.)

NOMENCLATURE

For the purposes of discussion in this topic, the following terms apply:

The term unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT) implies that no identifiable provoking environmental event for DVT is evident [1]. In contrast, a provoked DVT is one that is usually caused by a known event (eg, surgery, hospital admission). VTE events can be provoked by transient major risk factors (ie, major surgery >30 minutes, hospitalization or immobility ≥3 days, Cesarean section), transient minor risk factors (minor surgery <30 minutes, hospitalization <3 days, pregnancy, estrogen therapy, reduced mobility ≥3 days) or persistent risk factors. Persistent risk factors include reversible conditions (eg, curable malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease that resolves) and irreversible conditions such as inheritable thrombophilias, chronic heart failure, and metastatic end-stage malignancy. (See 'Overview of the causes of venous thrombosis'.)

Proximal DVT is one that is located in the popliteal, femoral, or iliac veins. Isolated distal DVT has no proximal component, is located below the knee, and is confined to the calf veins (peroneal, posterior, anterior tibial, and muscular veins) (table 1).

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Soleol
Literature review current through: Mar 2021. This topic last updated: May 07, 2020.
The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitutefor medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician orother qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. Theuse of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use©2021 UpToDate, Inc.
Soleil
Authors
Gregory YH Lip, MD, FRCPE, FESC, FACC

Gregory YH Lip, MD, FRCPE, FESC, FACC

The perfino daemon script is perfino/bin/perfino is linked in /etc/init.d by the installer. You now have to use the runlevel editor of your system tools to start perfino for selected runlevels. You now have to use the runlevel editor of your system tools to start perfino for selected runlevels. Perfino is a zero-overhead APM solution for monitoring Java application servers. Its powerful business transaction engine and its profiling capabilities help you to find and fix any performance problem in. Definition of perfino in the Definitions.net dictionary. Meaning of perfino. What does perfino mean? Information and translations of perfino in the most comprehensive. Translations in context of 'perfino' in Italian-English from Reverso Context: perfino per, perfino in, perfino tu, forse perfino, perfino quando. Perfino - translate into English with the Italian-English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionary. Perfino

  • Price-Evans Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Liverpool, UK
  • Distinguished Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Adjunct Professor, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
  • Adjunct Professor, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
Russell D Hull, MBBS, MSc

Russell D Hull, MBBS, MSc

  • Professor of Medicine
  • University of Calgary, Canada
Section Editors
Lawrence LK Leung, MDSolEol

Lawrence LK Leung, MD

SolEol
  • Editor-in-Chief — Hematology
  • Section Editor — Disorders of Hemostasis and Coagulation
  • Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor of Medicine
  • Stanford University School of Medicine
Jess Mandel, MD

Jess Mandel, MD

  • Section Editor — Pulmonary Vascular Disease
  • Kenneth M. Moser Professor of Medicine
  • Chief, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine
  • Vice-Chair for Education, Department of Internal Medicine
  • UC San Diego School of Medicine
Deputy Editor
Geraldine Finlay, MD

Geraldine Finlay, MD

  • Senior Deputy Editor — UpToDate
  • Deputy Editor — Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
  • Associate Professor
  • Tufts University School of Medicine

INTRODUCTION

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are two manifestations of venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE contributes to significant morbidity and mortality both in the community and in hospital. The mainstay of therapy for DVT is anticoagulation, provided there is no contraindication. Following initial anticoagulation, patients with DVT are anticoagulated further to prevent future recurrences, embolism, and thrombosis-related death.

An overview of the treatment of lower extremity DVT (distal and proximal), including indications for anticoagulation, alternate therapies, and treatment of special populations of patients with DVT, are discussed in this topic. Initial, long-term, and extended (indefinite) anticoagulation for DVT, as well as the treatment of PE, upper extremity DVT, and the diagnosis and prevention of DVT, are discussed in detail separately. (See 'Venous thromboembolism: Initiation of anticoagulation (first 10 days)' and 'Venous thromboembolism: Anticoagulation after initial management' and 'Rationale and indications for indefinite anticoagulation in patients with venous thromboembolism' and 'Treatment, prognosis, and follow-up of acute pulmonary embolism in adults' and 'Clinical presentation and diagnosis of the nonpregnant adult with suspected deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity' and 'Prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in acutely ill hospitalized medical adults' and 'Prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in adult nonorthopedic surgical patients'.)

NOMENCLATURE

For the purposes of discussion in this topic, the following terms apply:

The term unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT) implies that no identifiable provoking environmental event for DVT is evident [1]. In contrast, a provoked DVT is one that is usually caused by a known event (eg, surgery, hospital admission). VTE events can be provoked by transient major risk factors (ie, major surgery >30 minutes, hospitalization or immobility ≥3 days, Cesarean section), transient minor risk factors (minor surgery <30 minutes, hospitalization <3 days, pregnancy, estrogen therapy, reduced mobility ≥3 days) or persistent risk factors. Persistent risk factors include reversible conditions (eg, curable malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease that resolves) and irreversible conditions such as inheritable thrombophilias, chronic heart failure, and metastatic end-stage malignancy. (See 'Overview of the causes of venous thrombosis'.)

Proximal DVT is one that is located in the popliteal, femoral, or iliac veins. Isolated distal DVT has no proximal component, is located below the knee, and is confined to the calf veins (peroneal, posterior, anterior tibial, and muscular veins) (table 1).

To continue reading this article, you must log in with your personal, hospital, or group practice subscription. For more information on subscription options, click below on the option that best describes you:

Subscribers log in here

Literature review current through: Mar 2021. This topic last updated: May 07, 2020.

Soleil Fire Emblem

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitutefor medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician orother qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. Theuse of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use©2021 UpToDate, Inc.