Resolutionator

Resolution

Change resolutions faster than a T-1000 changes shapes!

Resolutionator

Resolutionator 2.0.1 macOS 5mb. Resolutionator makes it simple to use any of your display's available resolutions. Need more space for a project? A quick click of a menu bar icon or press of a keyboard shortcut lets you easily switch to any available resolution. No more time-consuming trips through System Preferences. Resolutionator makes it simple to use any of your display's available resolutions. Need more space for a project? A quick click of a menu bar icon or press of a keyboard shortcut lets you easily switch to any available resolution. With Resolutionator, you can switch between display resolutions quickly on any display you have hooked up. This is pretty handy if you’re using a Retina display, multiple displays, or even when. Resolutionator makes it simple to use any of your display’s available resolutions. Need more space for a project? A quick click of a menu bar icon or press of a keyboard shortcut lets you easily switch to any available resolution.

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Resolutionator makes it simple to use any of your display's available resolutions. Need more space for a project? A quick click of a menu bar icon—or press of a keyboard shortcut—lets you easily switch to any available resolution. No more time-consuming trips through System Preferences.

Designed with retina displays in mind, Resolutionator may also bring additional capabilities to your non-retina display, but we can't guarantee that. So we suggest everyone try the demo before purchasing, to make sure Resolutionator works well with your display(s).

Switch via the menu bar

If you're a menu bar utility person, Resolutionator's pre-set for your preferences: It ships in menu bar mode, giving you quick mouse fling-and-click access to all your resolutions.

If you've got multiple displays, you can access all of them through the same menu, as seen in the screenshot. Contrast that with the Displays System Preferences panel method, which requires mousing to each display to change its resolution.

Pin often-used resolutions

Depending on your Mac's display(s), you may see tons of options in Resolutionator's menu, making it tricky to find the one you want. Hold down the Option key, though, and you can pin resolutions so that they always show at the top of the list:

The Option key also lets you unpin previously-pinned resolutions, as seen in the screenshot.

Switch via the keyboard

If you prefer the keyboard, assign a hot key of your choosing and switch resolutions via this handy pop-up panel:

Resolutionator

It may appear you can only switch resolutions on one display, but fear not! Imazing. Tap the left arrow to reveal all attached displays; you can then change the resolution on any of them from that same panel.

See even more pixels

Depending on your display, macOS may offer three to five resolution choices; these are the choices you'll see by default in Resolutionator. If that's not enough for you, though, Resolutionator can show all the resolutions your display reports it's capable of producing, as seen in the movie at right. Just tell Resolutionator to show non-retina and/or silly resolutions in its preferences, and you'll see—depending on your display's capabilities—many more available resolutions.

In particular, enabling silly resolutions will show some resolutions that are greater than the number of pixels on your display. How does this magic work? macOS itself handles the task, scaling everything down to achieve the chosen resolution. You may not need silly resolutions often, but they can be a great help when looking at a page layout on an 11' MacBook Air, for example.

Macs ship with the display set at a certain resolution, and Apple defines this in the technical specifications for each model. But with Retina displays, these numbers can get confusing: there is the display’s resolution and the “looks like” resolution used on the Mac. Resolutions on Retina Macs look like half the actual number of pixels measured vertically and horizontally because of “pixel doubling.”

For example, if you have (as I do) a 5K iMac, the display resolution is 5120×2880, but the Displays pane of System Preferences tells me that it looks like 2560×1440.

That’s the default resolution, but you can change this if you want. To do so, you must first check Scaled in the Displays pane, as I have in the screenshot above, and you then see five options. These range from larger text to more space, with the Default setting in the middle.

If you have aging eyes or just want to see less on your display, try one of the settings to the left of the Default option. If you want to see more on the display—with smaller fonts, menus, etc.—then try one of the settings to the right. When you hover over one of these options, the Displays pane shows a text saying that “Using a scaled resolution may affect performance.” This is because your graphics card might not be able to keep up with a higher resolution (i.e., when things look smaller), or that some of your apps may not display correctly.

The 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro has a native resolution of 2560×1600 and uses a default “looks like” resolution of 1280×800. Things are a bit different with Apple’s 12-inch Retina MacBook. Its display has a resolution of 2304×1440, but the default “looks like” resolution it uses is not half that, but a bit more: 1280 x 800, just like the 13-inch MacBook Pro. So it looks like the same number of pixels, but on a display that’s one inch smaller diagonally. Naturally, these laptops offer other scaled options; each lets you choose from a total of four resolutions, from 1024×640 to 1440 900 (12-inch MacBook) or 1680×1050 (13-inch MacBook Pro).

If you have a second display connected to your Mac, you can choose a resolution for that display, also from the Displays pane of System Preferences. Select the display in the preference pane’s popup menu, then hold down the Option key and click the Scaled button to see your options.

Even more resolutions

Maybe you want even more choice in the resolution of your display. If so, you can use Many Tricks’ $3 Resolutionator. This utility lets you quickly switch resolutions without going to System Preferences, but also lets you choose from non-Retina resolutions. For example, in the screenshot below, you can see the options available on my 12-inch MacBook. I could choose to set its display to 2560×1600; that’s not the resolution that looks like half that, which is the default, but a resolution that actually uses using every pixel of the display.

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Naturally, things are quite small at that resolution, so you probably won’t want to do this often, but there may be times when you want to keep your eye on several windows at a time, and only a high resolution like that will work.

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When I work on my MacBook, I sometimes switch resolutions. When I’m focusing on writing, I use the native resolution, which makes texts large enough that I don’t need to strain, but if I have a lot of windows open, I sometimes go to a higher resolutions to get a broader view of what I’m doing. Try changing resolutions on your Mac; you may find that it’s easier to read texts, or that you can see more, than at the default resolution.